Every purchase supports the work of the RHS Every purchase supports the work of the RHS
  • damson Prune Damson (syn. Shropshire prune)
  • Eventual height: 4m
  • Eventual spread: 4m

damson 'Prune Damson'

damson Prune Damson (syn. Shropshire prune)

RHS award of garden merit £59.99
Pot size vVa-1 12lt (bush)
vVa-1 12lt (bush)
Quantity
  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: will tolerate most soils, except very chalky or badly drained
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Ultimate size on VVA1 rootstock: 3 x 3m (10x10ft)
  • Flowering period: April to May
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Damsons are a great fruit to grow if you are a novice gardener as they are hardier than its closest relative, the plum, and will cope with a wide range of soils. Native to the West Midlands, this small, compact tree was originally found in the local hedgerows. It is a self-fertile variety with medium sized fruits that can be cooked or baked and used in a variety of tasty recipes.

    This bush has been grafted onto VVA-1 rootstock, which produces a plant that is similar in size to those grafted onto 'Pixy' rootstock. They also tend to produce a higher yeild of larger fruit on plants that show a better winter hardiness.

    These damsons have been grown in an open field and then dug up as bare root plants when the weather conditions are right in Autumn. They have then been potted up as this helps to keep the roots protected, hydrated and in good condition. As they are dormant throughout the winter, they will not produce any new roots until spring, so don't be surprised if the compost falls away from the roots when you take them out of their pots. The trees can be kept in their pots throughout the winter provided they are kept well fed and watered, however ideally they should planted out as soon as possible when weather conditions allow.

  • Garden care: When planting incorporate lots of well-rotted garden compost in the planting hole and stake firmly.
    Stone fruits like the plums should be pruned in the summer because they are prone to a disease called Silver Leaf which enters through cuts. If you prune in late summer, the sap is slowing but is still running fast enoughenough to seal up any wounds. Check and remove any damaged, diseased or broken branches.
Share

Goes well with...

  • Ficus carica Brown Turkey
    fig 'Brown Turkey'
    £14.99 Buy
  • cherry Sunburst
    cherry 'Sunburst'
    £59.99 Buy
  • greengage Oullins Gage
    greengage 'Oullins Gage'
    £59.99 Buy
  • Juglans nigra
    Juglans nigra
    £59.99 Buy