Your purchase supports our charitable work. Thank you!

 

  • Eventual height: 2.4m
  • Eventual spread: 1.2m

Rosa 'Pippin'

rose pippin (climbing)

5 year guarantee
4 litre pot £29.99
£29.99
Quantity

This rose is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: July to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Offering a long season of colour and scent, 'Pippin' is an easy and rewarding rose that can be used to smother unsightly walls and fences - or be draped over pergolas and arches. It produces an abundance of salmon-flushed pink flowers throughout the summer, which look great against the backdrop of rich green foliage. It also shows some resistance to disease.

  • Garden care: If planting in winter, choose a frost-free spell when the soil is not frozen. Roses are quite deep-rooted plants so dig a deep hole roughly twice as wide as the plant’s roots and mix in a generous amount of composted organic matter. A top-dressing of a general purpose fertiliser can be worked into the surrounding soil and we also recommend using Rose Rootgrow at this stage to encourage better root development. This is particularly important when planting into a bed where roses have previously been grown as Rose Rootgrow is said to combat rose sickness (aka replant disease).

    Remove the plants from their pots and gently spread out the roots before placing them in the centre of the hole. Try to ensure that the 'bud union' (the point where the cultivated rose has been grafted onto the rootstock, and from where the shoots emerge) is at soil level. You can judge this quite easily by laying something flat, like a spade handle or bamboo cane, across the top of the hole. When they are at the right height, back-fill the hole, firming the soil down gently before watering the plant well.

    From late autumn to late winter, pop on a pair of tough gloves and remove any dead, damaged or weak-looking stems. Tie in new stems and shorten the side shoots of any flowered stems by up to two thirds. When the plants become congested, remove one or two of the oldest stems, cutting them right back to their base. Climbing roses usually respond well to hard pruning, so those that have become very overgrown can be renovated from late autumn to late winter. First remove any dead, damaged or weak-looking stems completely. Keeping from four to six young stems, cut all the others right back to their base. Shorten the side shoots on the remaining stems by up to a half and tie these onto the support.
Share