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  • common hornbeam
  • Eventual height: 25m
  • Eventual spread: 10m

Carpinus betulus

common hornbeam

5 year guarantee RHS award of garden merit
25 plants - 40-60cm £59.99
25 plants - 40-60cm £59.99
50 plants - 40-60cm £99.99
100 plants - 40-60cm £169.99
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This shrub is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun or partial shade
  • Soil: fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: March
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    To find out more about how to plant a hedge, click here

    A splendid tree with green leaves that turn a rich copper in autumn. As a tree The Royal Horticultural Society bare root hedging range is a very low cost way of planting a hedge. The bare root plants are only available to buy and plant when dormant. (November-March) These plants, with known seed provenence, are grown in 220 acres of rich Herefordshire soil. As they are dispatched directly from the fields, rather than through a nursery, they are much fresher than imported or even stored plants. RHS bare root plants are grown through low input horticultural methods. Plants are rotated with pigs annually, to improve soil condition. Water is harvested in the winter for use in the summer. No heat or polytunnels are used and, as the plants are dispatched direct from the fields, transport is kept to a minimum.

    Vivid green catkins in March, followed by clusters of green fruit, and toothed mid-green leaves turning orange and gold in autumn. Hornbeam is an excellent native tree for a large garden. Pyramidal in shape, it tolerates wet, clay soils and responds well to pruning, making it perfect for training as a formal hedge.

    These are sent out as bare root whips and should be planted out as soon as possible.

  • Garden care: To train as a central-leader standard remove all of the lateral branches on the lowest third of the main stem and shorten the laterals by half on the middle third, making angled cuts to an outward-facing bud. On the upper third remove only dead, diseased or damaged growth and crossing stems. It is essential though that any pruning is undertaken in late autumn or winter when they are fully dormant as the sap has a tendancy to 'bleed' if pruned at any other time of the year.

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