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Spring-flowering crocus collection

crocus collection

Perfect for pollinators
1 collection £9.99
£9.99
£29.97 £19.98
Quantity
  • Position: full sun
  • Soil: gritty, poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: February to March
  • Hardiness: fully hardy
  • Bulb size: 5/7

    Crocus are one of the first flowers to emerge in the garden and bees love them. They provide a very valuable food source for early insects when not many other plants are in flower and naturalise very well in lawns and borders. I never tire of watching bees feasting in the pollen parlour of early crocus blooms.

    In each collection you will receive 25 bulbs of each of the following:

    Crocus 'Snow Bunting'
    Yellow-centred white flowers, with a faint purple flush on the outside of the petals, add dazzling colour in late winter. Scatter the bulbs in large handfuls on top of the lawn and plant them where they fall to form naturalised drifts, or fill gaps at the front edge of a sunny border with generous clumps. If space is at a premium, they also look sweet when crowded into pots or windowboxes. Grows to 8cm.

    Crocus chrysanthus var. fuscotinctus
    Fragrant golden yellow, goblet-shaped flowers, with a bronze-green base and purple markings on the outer petals, appear in February and March with their slender, strap-shaped leaves. Perfect for naturalising in a sunny border or lawn, they also work well in pots and windowboxes, where you will be better able to take advantage of their sweet-smelling blooms. Grows to 10cm.

    Crocus 'Ruby Giant'
    Delightful, deep purple flowers in February and March and narrow, mid-green leaves. This early spring-flowering crocus is one of the best for naturalising in grass. Larger and more robust than other 'Tommy' varieties, it stands up well to winter weather, dying back gracefully after it has flowered. Grows to 8cm.

  • Garden care: Plant bulbs in naturalistic drifts 10cm (4in) deep in September or October. Where bulbs are planted in grass do not cut the lawn until after the leaves have died back.
  • CAUTION do not eat ornamental bulbs
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